INDOOR FAMILY ATTRACTIONS

Brr – I’m sure I don’t have to tell you that it’s cold in Brunswick County, NC. Though we have been having record setting low temperatures recently the result of which have been late start times for the Brunswick County Schools, we can still be thankful we have not had any of that beautiful precipitation called snow. Yes, it’s lovely to look at – but it’s not fun to shovel or drive in – especially in an area where there is no equipment for clearing the roads or melting the ice. Some of us have had other problems related to the low temperatures. As for me – this is the third time in a month that my pipes have frozen – and this time I did let my outside faucets drip. Hopefully, they will not burst again this time. And I know I am not alone in this predicament. The first time I understand there were problems all over the island. After tonight’s record setting low (again) the temperatures are supposed to be in the 50s tomorrow – I love you, tomorrow! Sunday will be even warmer, however, rain is predicted. I am sure families have been getting antsy from having to spend so much time indoors and the brief respite tomorrow will likely not be enough to get rid of the pent up energy, so here are a few suggestions for taking the whole family out for a fun and interesting day.

The North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport where they have a vintage periscope through which you can view the surrounding area:(http://southport.insiderinfo.us/attractions/southport/north-carolina-maritime-museum-at-southport/profile/)

Ingram Planetarium in Sunset Beach, NC where you can watch a light show and experience Category 1 hurricane force winds in the Science Hall’s Hurricane Simulator: (http://oceanislebeach.insiderinfo.us/attractions/sunset-beach/ingram-planetarium/profile/)

Planet Fun and Starz Grille in Shallotte, NC where you can have all kinds of fun and food as well:(http://oceanislebeach.insiderinfo.us/attractions/shallotte/planet-fun-and-starz-grille/profile/)

Spring Dreaming

Colorful_spring_garden

The wind is blowing, the icicles are dripping, icy rain is falling, I am bundled up and warm and dreaming of Spring. I could blame the groundhog – it seems his prediction is the same every year. Yes, I know, it could be worse. The midwest and northeast are being inundated with snow again and a foot of snow can fall in an hour there. Here, in Brunswick County, I don’t believe there has ever been a foot of snow. But I am spoiled. I have often bragged to relatives in the northeast saying that Spring begins here in February. And it does – usually. The redwinged blackbirds were swarming the other day – one of the signs of the coming Spring that I have come to recognize. And I saw a bluebird just yesterday. There seem to be buds on some of the early blooming plants as well. But, as this weather is proving, you cannot depend on these as harbingers of Spring. There is, however, a sure sign of Spring that we who live on these barrier islands have come to recognize:

The Awakening

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of green crocus spears
thrusting their tips through frozen ground and snow,
bursting with the energy of new life,
anxious to claim the Spring.

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of daffodils
uncurling their golden trumpets,
playing a fanfare of beauty to usher in the season.

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of a robin,
it’s red waistcoat bursting with pride
gathering twigs to build a new home,
to feather its season of love and new life.

Spring comes to the islands,
in the color of white
shining in the sunlight;
in the shape of sails
billowing in the March wind,
carrying the boats north through the waterway
like their great white wings
carry the ibis out to sea.

Rebecca Pierre