PARKS & RECREATION FUN

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If are looking for something fun to do in Brunswick County, NC it’s a good bet that you will find it provided by the Parks and Recreation Departments of the towns. The employees of these departments are fun loving individuals who come up with ideas – and carry out those ideas – for events that are available to you on a continuing basis. You will find information about some of those upcoming events here.

Town of Oak Island, NC Parks and Recreation:
If you have missed the Summer Concert Series up to this point do not despair, there will be three more Friday evening concerts (6:30 PM – 8:30 PM) at Middleton Park. Those dates are 8/10, 8/17 and 8/24.
On 8/11, 8/16 and 8/25 you can check out Nature is Wild About Reading at the Oak Island Nature Center. Here, kids can listen to stories and make fun crafts from 11 AM until noon. Topics include: 8/11 – Seashells, 8/16 – Land and Sea Turtles, 8/25 – Trees, Leaves and Bark. Please preregister kids ages 4 and up at 278-5518.
On 8/14 at 6 PM you might enjoy the Turtle Talk offered by the OKI Sea Turtle Protection Program.
Interested in the coastal birds? Here’s one for you:
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8/15 from 2 PM until 3:30 PM you can learn all the tips and tricks of Bird Photography at a free program. You will also get tips on places nearby where you can find birds to photograph, how to stage your backyard to welcome birds, and understanding bird behavior.
How about a trip to Lake Waccamaw (fee $5) on 8/23 from 9 AM until 2 PM to see Alligators Up Close & Personal? (preregistration required)
And don’t forget the Labor Day Surf Off on 9/1.

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Boiling Spring Lakes, NC Parks and Recreation:
The Monthly Birthday Ice Cream Social is held from 12:30 PM until 1 PM the second Friday of each month. Come on out and celebrate with an ice cream sundae.
Karate for Kids is held on Mondays from 6 PM until 7 PM from August 13 through December 17.
Put your dancing shoes on and join the Line Dancing on Wednesdays at 6:30 PM.
Bring your lunch and enjoy Brown Bag Lunch and a Movie on 8/16 from 11 AM until 2 PM.
Come to Dress Like a Nerd Day and enjoy lunch and maybe win a prize on 8/22 from 12 noon until 1 PM.
Get your friends together and join in the fun for Afternoon Adult Trivia on 8/23 from 11 AM until 2 PM. Pizza, salad and cash prizes will be offered. ($5 and RSVP by 8/20)

MUSIC IN MARCH

Music is in the air all over Brunswick County, NC. If you pay attention you can hear birds singing. They sing the sunrise into the sky, continue their concert throughout the day, and sing the sun to sleep at night. The breeze sings its own song – rustling through the leaves of the trees and setting off wind chimes. The ocean is constantly singing and yet sings a different song each day. Sometimes it is soft and gentle and sometimes it roars. If you like organized music, March is a great month to indulge yourself. The U. S. Navy Concert Band will be presenting a free concert at the Brunswick Community College Odell Williamson Auditorium ( http://leland.insiderinfo.us/arts/museum-hall-organization/brunswick-community-college-odell-williamson-auditorium/profile/)

in Bolivia, NC on Wednesday, March 11, at 7:30 PM. The concert band has been performing public, family friendly concerts for 90 years. The concert will feature marches, patriotic works and orchestral selections.

Our very own Sea Notes Choral Society (http://southport.insiderinfo.us/arts/music/sea-notes-choral-society/profile/)

will present their Spring Concert on March 27, 28 and 29 in the NC Baptist Assembly Auditorium in Caswell Beach, NC. This concert will be a fun event for those of us who recall the songs of the 60s as these songs will be featured in this free concert. The March 27 performance will take place at 7:30 PM while the March 28 and March 29 performances will happen at 3 PM. With three chances to make it to this event, how can you lose?

On March 13, 14 and 15, the Stagestruck Players of Brunswick Little Theater (http://southport.insiderinfo.us/arts/theater/brunswick-little-theatre/profile/)

will present Godspell Jr. at their theater in Southport, NC. The Friday and Saturday performances will begin at 7:30 PM and the Sunday performance will be at 3 PM.

 

 

 

Spring Dreaming

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The wind is blowing, the icicles are dripping, icy rain is falling, I am bundled up and warm and dreaming of Spring. I could blame the groundhog – it seems his prediction is the same every year. Yes, I know, it could be worse. The midwest and northeast are being inundated with snow again and a foot of snow can fall in an hour there. Here, in Brunswick County, I don’t believe there has ever been a foot of snow. But I am spoiled. I have often bragged to relatives in the northeast saying that Spring begins here in February. And it does – usually. The redwinged blackbirds were swarming the other day – one of the signs of the coming Spring that I have come to recognize. And I saw a bluebird just yesterday. There seem to be buds on some of the early blooming plants as well. But, as this weather is proving, you cannot depend on these as harbingers of Spring. There is, however, a sure sign of Spring that we who live on these barrier islands have come to recognize:

The Awakening

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of green crocus spears
thrusting their tips through frozen ground and snow,
bursting with the energy of new life,
anxious to claim the Spring.

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of daffodils
uncurling their golden trumpets,
playing a fanfare of beauty to usher in the season.

Spring comes to the islands,
not in the shape of a robin,
it’s red waistcoat bursting with pride
gathering twigs to build a new home,
to feather its season of love and new life.

Spring comes to the islands,
in the color of white
shining in the sunlight;
in the shape of sails
billowing in the March wind,
carrying the boats north through the waterway
like their great white wings
carry the ibis out to sea.

Rebecca Pierre

Hammocks

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There is no question about it, hammocks are essential to living in the beaches of Brunswick County. What better place to stretch out and relax? Weekends or weekdays, retired or still working  – it does not make a difference. You can read a book or take a nap – stretch out after mowing or working in the garden – swing lazily or frolic with the kids in a hammock. No matter your style of living, hammocks fit right in. They can be strung between trees or placed free standing on a patio or porch. You can even take one down to the beach to relax in the sun or under a canopy. Here is my take on the hammock in my front yard:

HAMMOCK*

This hammock, connecting
tree to tree, becomes a
suspension bridge for ants
who travel the rope that
borders the edge. Focused,
they never lose their way,
never deviate into the web
of highways, the tempting
byways of the green
knotted network that forms
the bed. While live oak branches
bow in an elegant sweep
to the ground, pieces of sky
hide among the leaves overhead.
A blue jay startles herself
by landing too close to
the hammock. A mockingbird,
so enraptured by his own song,
lifts straight up from a fence post
at intervals in his singing.
A grey squirrel sits in
a patch of sun, holds
a toadstool in her paws,
turning it with her delicate
fingers as she eats her
way around the edge. This
is the business of the world.
Our business is not to miss it.

Rebecca Pierre

*This poem has been published in: Literary Trails of Eastern North Carolina: A Guidebook by Georgann Eubanks. The book is described on Amazon this way:

“This concluding volume of the Literary Trails of North Carolina trilogy takes readers into an ancient land of pale sand, dense forests, and expansive bays, through towns older than our country and rich in cultural traditions. Here, writers reveal lives long tied to the land and regularly troubled by storms and tell tales of hardship, hard work, and freedom. Eighteen tours lead readers from Raleigh to the Dismal Swamp, the Outer Banks, and across the Sandhills as they explore the region’s connections to over 250 writers of fiction, poetry, plays, and creative nonfiction. Along the way, Georgann Eubanks brings to life the state’s rich literary heritage as she explores these writers’ connection to place and reveals the region’s vibrant local culture. Excerpts invite readers into the authors’ worlds, and web links offer resources for further exploration. Featured authors include A. R. Ammons, Gerald Barrax, Charles Chesnutt, Clyde Edgerton, Philip Gerard, Kaye Gibbons, Harriet Jacobs, Jill McCorkle, Michael Parker, and Bland Simpson.”

Literary Trails of North Carolina is a project of the North Carolina Arts Council